Dead Osama, The ‘Changed World’, And Pakistan

Posted on May 12, 2011 in GlobeScope

By Ashik Gosaliya:

The most dramatic and risible words that I have heard post Osama Bin Laden killing is “World Has Changed”. I would like to pinch these enthusiasts with philosophical reality that world changes almost every single nano second, so perfect tense is not perfect for ever changing world.

I have been rigorously reading the articles and blogs boisterously pouring from every possible and impossible corner of information in the aftermath of what happened on 05/01. Thousands of conspiracy theorists born and millions of views started circulating within the moments President of the United States proclaimed the killing of the most wanted terrorist and mastermind of the most heinous terror attack on US soil.

While reading enormous amount of information ornamented with extreme knowledge of a writer in the English language in their articles and blogs, only one thought came to my mind. Question my mind raised was: what could be the agenda these writers are serving for writing their article or blog?

After reading hundreds of articles on diplomacy, foreign affairs, Islamic terrorism, Af-Pak and what not in just four days time, I’m forced to conclude without thinking about the due process in merely one phrase “World has not changed”. The US will keep on invading other nations at will. Pakistan will keep on nurturing the terrorists for its own survival. India has nothing to do with this.

Actually, analysts would have been more accurate in saying “India can do nothing in this”. For India, I seriously consider Osama’s killing, a real setback to the Indian efforts and huge strategic blow to its regional standing. Highly glorified US exit from Afghanistan is nothing short than Indian diplomatic failure. Though US plans of withdrawal are aporetic and seen with suspicion by world community, however, redeployment of US forces will give enough space to Pakistan in Afghan territory. That directly means curtailment of India’s role in Afghanistan.

Osama’s presence in Pakistan has cleared enough clouds over the fact that terrorism is a byproduct of Pakistan’s state actors. More than any other terror organization, the Pakistan Army’s trusted pawn ISI is the biggest supporter. What stops the US to take action against Pakistan? Well! Pakistan’s strategic geopolitical importance is well-known. But most skeptical argument is: How far is it affordable for the US to nurture the rogue state? The diplomatic answer is: as long as US decides to maintain the fear of Pakistan being in the possession of nuclear arsenals.

The world over has accepted the fact that radicalization of Pakistan is the biggest threat and challenge in years to come. Many skillful writers, analysts and theorists proposed many ideas and suggested many options to tackle the Pakistan based terrorism. Well for me, Pakistan has reached at the point of no return. You may find my view very radical but only iron can cut the iron. For Pakistan, time for renovation and refurbishment has gone. Now time demands reincarnation of Pakistan.

Neither the modernization of Pakistan Army is possible (obvious reasons) nor can you expect its civilian leaders to be honest and dedicated towards the betterment of people. Almost every analyst or theorist believes that Pakistan is “too important to fail”. Against this, I’ve only one argument to place. What if tomorrow one of the obstreperous terror groups attempts a failed terror plot on US soil? Won’t that change the world for Pakistan?

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