Samajwadi Party : The New Rulers Of The Nation Despite The Goonda Raj?

Posted on September 7, 2012 in Politics at Play

By Ipsa Arora:

The Samajwadi party describes itself as a Democratic Socialist party mainly representing the interests of a caste grouping called the Other Backward Classes (OBCs). But do they really do so? By adopting the Goonda Raj? Ever since the victory of Akhilesh Yadav as the Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh, people have been afraid that the much dreaded goonda raj is gradually returning. His victory was seen as evidence that the party was up for a different kind of politics. Various journalists were attacked on the day of the results, forcing them to declare their candidate victorious even if he had lost. Episodes of violence have been piling up in the state, targeting mostly Dalits. Is this how they represent the backward classes?

There have been several such instances where the goonda raj has prevailed in the state. The leaders of the party who were arrested on criminal charges under the rule of ex-chief minister Mayawati are freely roaming about in the state. Members of the Samajwadi Party like Mukhtar Ansari and Vijay Mishra were allowed to have lunch with Pranab Mukherjee before he took over as the President of India. They were also allowed to attend the assembly proceedings. In another instance reported, Vijay Mishra was bailed out of jail after spending one and a half years there. He was caught offering a bribe to the police officials after he was released and to top it all, he had sixty-two criminal cases against him. Is this how justice is granted under the rule of the party?

Do we as citizens of the country, see a political party such as this bracing itself for the 2014 general elections? They have already started calling it the ‘Samajwadi Party Mission 2014‘ and have made pages on social networking sites as a part of their campaign, to start with.

The Samajwadi party has finalized names of fifty-eight constituencies for the 2014 elections and over nine hundred people have expressed their desire to contest in the elections. Sources have revealed that they have finalized candidates for close to thirty seats out of the total eighty Lok Sabha seats in UP. They are confident on winning and besides their mission, posters of Lakshya 2014 have been put up all over the state. But the question that arises here is that, can we really see a regional party at the national level? Can we see the atrocities and violence spreading from UP to the rest of the nation?

In an all party meeting by the Prime Minister, Dr Manmohan Singh in Delhi, Samajwadi Party was the only party that opposed the Constitutional Amendment for ensuring reservation in promotion of the SC/ST officers thus proving that the party wants to function in a manner that is different from the rest of the nation.

The party chief Mulayam Singh Yadav has said that a Samajwadi Party led, Third Front Government will be formed after the 2014 elections. On another hand, a Congress leader states that with the decline of law and order in Uttar Pradesh and numerous communal riots happening in places like Lucknow, Allahabad, Bareilly and Mathura, the Congress can no longer be a mute spectator. Will this never ending conflict between the political parties lead to a better rule or the formation of a Third Front in the country? Only time will tell.

Youth Ki Awaaz

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