Being The PM Is No Child’s Play: With Games Like ‘Fekuexpress’, How Lame Can Our Politicians Get?

By Vinati Bhola:

The political tousle between the national parties, Congress and BJP is eternal. We all have been critically observing the tactics of both these parties for the upcoming elections for quite some time now. Narendra Modi v. Rahul Gandhi is the root subject of most of the debates in almost every household across the country. It amazes me how these political parties come up with extraordinary ideas against one another, attracting as much support – and in turn, votes in their kitty – as they can.

The latest card is played by Congress against BJP. It is surprisingly, in guise of an online game named ‘Fekuexpress’. The game specifically mocks at claims of Gujarat’s Chief Minister Narendra Modi. It asks users to predict his lies and to the winners, it promises two free tickets of the recent Shahrukh Khan’s movie Chennai Express which, needless to say, also inspired the unusual name of the game.

fekuexpress

To many, it seems that Congress’ Fekuexpress is a desperate attempt to give a striking reply to BJP’s action of labelling their ace Rahul Gandhi as Pappu. However, the top leaders of both the parties never overtly took part or encouraged such actions, until now. The former Chief Minister of Madhya Pradesh Mr. Digvijay Singh officially launched the site fekuexpress.com with an extremely sleazy tag line ‘Feku Bumper Dhamaka! Predict and Win!’ and indulged in passing of unpleasant comments against Modi. To see a leader of high prestige indulge in such lame one-liners is very disheartening because, in the end, it is these people who steer the nation in some way or the other.

‘Fekuexpress’ has already registered over 13,0000 hits. Given that it is promoted by the top Congress officials, the statistics do not astonish me. In fact, I wonder the time and energy invested in devolving such childlike ploys and how it could have been put to a lot better use like debating on relevant issues.

Coming to the ever famous question swirling around these days: Who do you want to be the PM? I’m really perplexed and a little agitated too. The main choices that I have are the ones joking around insensitively with ‘Feku’ or ‘Pappu’ tricks. They are behaving like two little kids in middle school competing to be the monitor of the class. I don’t want my leader to be of an unfledged and immature category. I want a righteous human being whose action projects that my country’s future is in good hands. I want my leader to be sensitive enough to accept his role as a leader and not just wave off the responsibility by saying that we should not ask how our politicians would solve a problem instead question ourselves. (In special reference to what Rahul Gandhi told to a JNU student recently, on how to create awareness about internet in Government schools.) I want my leader to represent us, not just in black and white but in real world, in the practical world.

Because serving as the Prime Minister of India is no child’s play.

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6 Responses

  1. arp

    I think the political parties must opt for sensible campaigns .Instead of wasting their time and energy in devising such cheap tricks to slander each other’s opponents they should put their thoughts to better use , by directing them to the various problems faced by our country. In such times of crises, campaigns should be focused at solving the problems and votes should be lured in by promising effective solutions .

    Reply
  2. sg02

    fun? even wihtout launching the ‘feku express’, everything in our country is a big joke now! if only the ruling party would take our country a little more seriously:
    there would no Chinese intrusion in arunachal,
    less ceasefire violations by Pak,
    Rs-$ not at 64,
    much less corruption and filling of private pockets,
    less communal rift in the janta… to name some!

    Reply
  3. Divyank Rana

    It is not being against witty comments or positive criticism by the political parties but when it comes to the national elections a decorum needs to be maintained by the prospective leaders of the country.Our hon’ble supreme court has rightly said “it is true that freedom of speech and expression is the basic foundation of democracy but it is not a guardian to unlimited talkativeness.”

    When we take “fekuexpress” into the picture, its not hard to see that there is no positive criticism here. It is criticism just for the sake of criticizing and damaging the reputation of a leader. I would prefer leaders who would rather discuss policies and not make a mockery out of each other.
    Maybe our politicians need to learn from the judiciary where even while rebutting, one is titled as the “learned counsel”.

    It can easily be said that both the idea of the game and the word “feku” lack sophistication and hence they are to be termed as vulgar.

    Reply
  4. Manan Grover

    I see hypocrisy in people when they call acts like ‘feku express’ immature on the part of the leaders. It is these people who want their government to take their witty comments and digs at political parties and leaders on social networking sites (like making fun of the ‘theek hai’ comment made by the PM on twitter, caricatures of political leaders) in a humorous way and not pose restrictions on the internet, are now behaving all morally correct and have left their funny bone when the parties want to a fun element to their electoral campaign to grab the attention of the youth.

    As long as these witty acts do not cross the line and become vulgar and obscene. the public should not have any problem with it.

    Reply
    • Divyank Rana

      I am not against witty comments or positive criticism by the political parties but when it comes to the national elections a decorum needs to be maintained by the prospective leaders of the country.Our hon’ble supreme court has rightly said “it is true that freedom of speech and expression is the basic foundation of democracy but it is not a guardian to unlimited talkativeness.”

      When we take “fekuexpress” into the picture, its not hard to see that there is no positive criticism here. It is criticism just for the sake of criticizing and damaging the reputation of a leader. I would prefer leaders who would rather discuss policies and not make a mockery out of each other.
      Maybe our politicians need to learn from the judiciary where even while rebutting, one is titled as the “learned counsel”.

      It can easily be said that both the idea of the game and the word “feku” lack sophistication and hence they are to be termed as vulgar.

      Reply
    • Vaishali Jain

      Fun element? Yes, we can handle that. But where is the fun that you’re talking about? It merely shows they want to pull each other down. I cannot respect the sort of comments they make. And, really, this so-called contest does not sound vulgar, but it does show that politics has reduced to cheap gimmicks.

      Reply