This post has been self-published on Youth Ki Awaaz by Trisha Gupta. Just like them, anyone can publish on Youth Ki Awaaz.

We Are Equally Qualified, We Do The Same Jobs, But We Don’t Get The Same Pay!

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By Trisha Gupta:

If two people do the same work, dedicate the same amount of time to it, and are equally skilled, they should be earning the same amount of money, right? Wrong. There is another question one must ask in order to determine that – do they belong to the same gender?

Disparity in the wages of men and women is a worldwide phenomenon. Even when women participate at par with men, they continue to be denied higher positions in organisations. This phenomenon even has a specific term. Wage computing agencies call it the “glass ceiling”, beyond which a woman cannot rise.

Picture credits: lukexmartin
Picture credits: lukexmartin

However, I come bearing some good news. According to data from the National Sample Survey Office, the average wage rate for women, which was 29.2% lower than that of men in 2004-05, is now only one-fifth lower than men (Still lower, mind you). Why this sudden decrease, you ask? The main reason is what experts like to call a “supply-side crunch”, which means a period in which the supply of a particular product is lower than its demand, thereby leading to higher prices. The ‘product’ in this context are women employees.

Moreover, there is an increased social awareness and acknowledgement of gender rights, but there are other important reasons as well. Due to a rise in family incomes, more and more women are withdrawing from work, especially in the rural areas, as stated in a Mint analysis. Another reason may be that an increasing number of women are now choosing education over their farm jobs. An additional explanation can be given with reference to the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MNGREGA). This Act has attempted to standardised wages and encourages the participation of women in the workforce. A study conducted by the Indian Institute of Delhi called “The Demographic Challenge and Employment Growth in India” shows that MNGREGA is responsible for nearly 70% of the new employment opportunities in rural India.

But there is another side to the story. One might hope that a reduction in the gender gap in pay will also be accompanied by an improvement in working conditions. Wrong again! And this time, the victims are both men as well as women. Jayan Jose Thomas, assistant Professor at IIT Delhi and the person in charge of the survey states that due to an “informalisation” of the workforce, more people are being employed without any written contracts. Moreover, in many sectors, specially the construction sector, there is a serious breach of labour laws. In addition, while the employees are paying more wages, they are stifling the benefits. Statistical data shows that about 7 out of every 10 workers do not get paid leaves. Likewise, a higher proportion of women as compared to 2004-05 are not eligible for social security benefits. This could be due to a faster rise in wages, combined with a higher proportion of temporary wages.

In this economy where a landing a “good” job is as valuable as discovering a hidden treasure, people have no other option but to accept the jobs with the terrible conditions that they come with. So, the silver lining to the cloud that came in the form of decrease in the wage gap seems to be followed by yet another cloud of deteriorating work conditions.

You must be to comment.
    1. D Gill

      Babar, kindly STFU.

    2. Dakksh

      Babar, I have fallen in love with you, you have given me so much feminism literature material, that I am taking a month’s break to sit and just read, read and read. Keep them coming :).

    3. Dakksh

      When women go to work, they leave their children with in-laws, babysitters, domestic help, nannies, and day care centres to fulfill their selfish pursuit of a paycheque, which they spend on shopping and cosmetics anyway. Women deprive their children of motherly love in the process, are too tired to come home and cook, too tired to sit down with their children and check homework, classwork, sit down with them and educate them, and then we wonder why divorce rates are shooting through the roof. Women’s false pursuit of independence and liberation has left a generation of neglected children, fulfilling the agenda of feminists.

      Response – Men, the selfish and uttermost stupid creatures, good enough for sperms and are not capable of taking care of his own kids, how USELESS. Easily distracted by beer and shiny cars. Neglecting his own children to spend time with his mates and drinking beer, pig like cratures. These idiots can not even be trusted with their own children. The worst kind of animal. For the fake sense of career and pursuit of making, so as to spend on Cars and beer, leaving his own children longing to spend time with him. Yuck

      “In order to raise children with equality, we must take them away from families and communally raise them.” – Dr. Mary Jo Bane, feminist and assistant professor of education at Wellesley College and associate director of the school’s Center for Research on Woman.

      Response – Patriarchal system detaches a women from her own home and puts her in someone else’s life and home, like commodities. What will children learn from such system of family? Only to degrade women further.

      “Women, like men, should not have to bear children… The destruction of the biological family, never envisioned by Freud, will allow the emergence of new women and men, different from any people who have previously existed.” — Alison Jagger – Political Philosophies of Women’s Liberation: Feminism and Philosophy (Totowa, NJ: Littlefield, Adams & Co. 1977).

      A – What problem do you have with this? Men are not degraded if they do not have children, then why women should? You are Pro Equality, are not you?

      “No woman should be authorized to stay at home and raise her children. Society should be totally different. Women should not have that choice, precisely because if there is such a choice, too many women will make that one.” — Simone de Beauvoir, “Sex, Society, and the Female Dilemma” Saturday Review, June 14, 1975, p.18

      Response – Again Equality

      “Marriage has existed for the benefit of men; and has been a legally sanctioned method of control over women… We must work to destroy it. The end of the institution of marriage is a necessary condition for the liberation of women. Therefore it is important for us to encourage women to leave their husbands and not to live individually with men.” -The Declaration of Feminism, November 1971.

      Response – Putting a women with a man, in a closed, unsupervised area, have perpetuated violence against women. Should not women leave their husbands if they are not worth it? And I think all Men are Pigs.

      “The nuclear family must be destroyed, and people must find better ways of living together.” – Linda Gordon, Function of the Family, Women: A Journal of Liberation, Fall, 1969.

      Response – Amen to that

      “We can’t destroy the inequities between men and women until we destroy marriage.” – Robin Morgan, Sisterhood is Powerful, 1970, p.537.

      Response – Absolutely, as thats where women subjugation starts, and women get trained to fit in marriage from birth, which would rather be unnecessory if we destroy marriage and women will be set free and make her own decisions.

    4. Dakksh

      Wonderful video. Amen to last part, that Men MUST start taking responsibility of taking care of his children, that every other animal is doing. Amen to that.

  1. Babar

    First off, you are paid for your work according to your experience, academic credentials, skills, and how well you do your job. It is not a question of a man and a woman working the same job not being paid the same, even two men or two women working the same job will not be paid the same. Two doctors, two engineers, two teachers, etc, will be paid differently. Secondly, women earn less because women work less number of hours than men, take maternity leave, work easier jobs than men, and take courses in college which pay less.

    http://youtu.be/vyFjPHwF6To

    1. Trisha

      This article was a based on facts. If you want the specific statistics, take a look for yourself http://www.livemint.com/Page/Id/2.2.1373707903
      and all these comments by you scream out misogynist, big time!

    2. Babar

      Yet another propaganda. You need to watch the posted videos.

  2. Babar

    Articles on YKA by feminists fighting to study humanities, and then they argue why they are paid less competing with men who choose courses which pay much higher.

    Here’s What It Really Means To Study Humanities In India

    I Chose Humanities Over Science Not Because I Am ‘Dumb’

    Interested In ‘Humanities’, Go For It!

    1. Trisha

      What exactly are you implying? That humanities subjects pay less? That women are meant for humanities, and hence they get paid less?

    2. Fem

      Babar, for some reasons, hate humanities. (My guess – Because he has lost out on any humanity inside of him so hate the word ‘human’ and anything which uses this word ).

      He goes on and on against it in almost all his posts.

    3. Babar

      If you are going to study humanities, please don’t complain about lesser pay competing with men in math and science streams.

  3. Babar

    Why do we need reservations for women, from the parliament to the corporate world? It shows that women cannot compete with men fairly, and less qualified women are now taking over men’s jobs. While men need money to support their families, women need jobs to spend on clothes and cosmetics. Since women cannot compete with men, they cry reservation. Women’s incompetence also explains why they have sex with their bosses to climb the ladder in the corporate world.

    1. Trisha

      before commenting on the incompetence of women, ask yourself why their bosses ask them for sexual favours in return for a raise or a promotion.. If you really think that a woman’s position in her job has nothing to do with the fact that she is a woman, then my friend, you are terribly wrong.

  4. Babar

    When women go to work, they leave their children with in-laws, babysitters, domestic help, nannies, and day care centres to fulfill their selfish pursuit of a paycheque, which they spend on shopping and cosmetics anyway. Women deprive their children of motherly love in the process, are too tired to come home and cook, too tired to sit down with their children and check homework, classwork, sit down with them and educate them, and then we wonder why divorce rates are shooting through the roof. Women’s false pursuit of independence and liberation has left a generation of neglected children, fulfilling the agenda of feminists.

    “In order to raise children with equality, we must take them away from families and communally raise them.” – Dr. Mary Jo Bane, feminist and assistant professor of education at Wellesley College and associate director of the school’s Center for Research on Woman.

    “Women, like men, should not have to bear children… The destruction of the biological family, never envisioned by Freud, will allow the emergence of new women and men, different from any people who have previously existed.” — Alison Jagger – Political Philosophies of Women’s Liberation: Feminism and Philosophy (Totowa, NJ: Littlefield, Adams & Co. 1977).

    “No woman should be authorized to stay at home and raise her children. Society should be totally different. Women should not have that choice, precisely because if there is such a choice, too many women will make that one.” — Simone de Beauvoir, “Sex, Society, and the Female Dilemma” Saturday Review, June 14, 1975, p.18

    “Marriage has existed for the benefit of men; and has been a legally sanctioned method of control over women… We must work to destroy it. The end of the institution of marriage is a necessary condition for the liberation of women. Therefore it is important for us to encourage women to leave their husbands and not to live individually with men.” -The Declaration of Feminism, November 1971.

    “The nuclear family must be destroyed, and people must find better ways of living together.” – Linda Gordon, Function of the Family, Women: A Journal of Liberation, Fall, 1969.

    “We can’t destroy the inequities between men and women until we destroy marriage.” – Robin Morgan, Sisterhood is Powerful, 1970, p.537.

    1. akshita prasad

      well, i was left with my grandmom most of my childhood, since both my parents worked. And if i think about it now, i didn’t end up being “neglected”. And i never saw her throwing all her money on clothes or cosmetics, she earned to give me the luxury of designing my own life. My mom came back and checked my homework each day, she taught me each day. And i was never deprived of “motherly love” . And yes, my parents got divorced and it wasn’t because of my mom’s working, it was because of my dad being a jerk. And, oh yes! , i am a feminist, but i don’t see anything wrong with that. And just to make it clear, feminists aren’t men hatters, all feminists do is argue equality.

      Well, since you are skeptical of working women, do you want to share insights, on how bad or devious my mother is? or how spoil i am. And also, maybe my mom has less time to spend with me, and teach me things. At the end of the day, i have a better perspective that you do.

      And about the divorce rates? Will divorce’s happen because people can’t get along with each other well. And trust me, living together without loving one another, is a terrible thing to do. Divorces can prove to be good.

    2. Babar

      The feminist agenda runs on all women are helpless victims and all men are abusive perpetrators tagline. The hatred of men is evident in feminist theories, articles, comments, interviews, programs, etc.

      Below are some quotes from feminists:

      “I want to see a man beaten to a bloody pulp with a high-heel shoved in his mouth, like an apple in the mouth of a pig.” – Andrea Dworkin from her book ‘Ice and Fire’.

      “Men who are unjustly accused of rape can sometimes gain from the experience.” – Catherine Comin, Vassar College.

      “All sex, even consensual sex between a married couple, is an act of violence perpetrated against a woman – Catherine MacKinnon (Feminist).

      “All men are rapists and that’s all they are” – Marilyn French, Author.

      “A woman needs a man like a fish needs a bicycle” – Gloria Steinem

    3. Fem

      Love you Babar. You are a sweetheart.

      “Women go to work, to fulfill their selfish pursuit of a paycheque, which they spend on shopping and cosmetics anyway”

      My 2 bits:

      (1) When they are at home looking after whatever they are supposed to look after, you call them parasites on men and accuse them of leeching off their husband’s income while lounging around at home.

      (2) You are an authority on where women spend their income. Shopping and cosmetics namely. Are you the head of ‘Fact Finding Commission’ on Women’s Spending Pursuits?

    4. Babar

      It didn’t just happen that globally plastic surgery, cosmetics, fashion, beauty, and diet industries are thriving on the billions dished at them by women.

    5. Trisha

      Selfish pursuit of a paycheck? Why is it selfish the minute a woman pursues? More importantly, why is childcare the sole responsibility of a woman? What about the father? Or is it alright if he selfishly pursues his paycheck and deprives the child of fatherly love?

    6. Babar

      Women are more attached to their children than men are, and the mother-child bond is stronger than the bond between father and children. Biologically and psychologically, women are supposed to have and raise kids.

  5. Trisha

    Babar, biologically women can have kids. That doesn’t in any way mean that they are supposed to. Having kids is a choice. And responsibility is supposed to be shared by both men and women. No single party is the sole one responsible.

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