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Writers Boycott London Edition Of Jaipur Lit. Fest Sponsored By ‘Most Hated Company’

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By YKA Staff:

Editor’s note: Jaipur Literature festival, which first started in 2006, has now become one of the biggest cultural festivals in the country, with the most prominent figures of Indian and international literature and media taking part in it each year. It has now grown to become an international event and is being held in various parts of the world, with large support from many large corporations. Recently, the London edition of the festival has come under fire after Vedanta, a metals and mining company infamous for human rights violations, became the title sponsor. Dozens of academics, authors and activists around the world have penned an open letter, urging writers to boycott the event. 

Dear All,

We are deeply shocked and dismayed to hear that you have agreed to participate at the Jaipur Literature Festival claiming to be “The Greatest Literary Show on Earth” which has ‘the world’s most hated company‘ Vedanta as its key sponsor. Are you aware that Vedanta’s activities are destroying the lives of thousands of people in Odisha, Chhattisgarh, Goa, Tamil Nadu, Rajasthan, Karnataka and Punjab and also in Zambia, South Africa and Australia? Are you also aware that Zambian villagers are currently taking Vedanta subsidiary KCM to court in the UK, accusing it of consistently poisoning their water over the last decade?

In 2011 Zambian High Court Judge Phillip Musonda said he wanted to make an example of Vedanta for their ‘gross recklessness’ in polluting the River Kafue without remorse, and highlighted ‘KCM’s don’t care attitude whether human life which sacrosanct in our constitution was lost or not.’ In 2014 Vedanta 69% owner and Chairman Anil Agarwal was caught on video bragging to businessmen at a Bangalore conference that he had bought the Zambian copper mines at a fraction of their value and was making $500 million each year despite declaring a loss in Zambia. The Zambian government reacted by auditing the mines, and discovered vast tax evasion schemes and asset stripping.

In Korba, Chhattisgarh, India between 40 and 100 workers died at Vedanta subsidiary BALCO’s aluminium smelter complex when a chimney under construction collapsed on them in September 2009. The subsequent judicial inquiry into the incident found Vedanta guilty of negligence and using sub-standard materials and construction methods. However, Vedanta’s lawyers suppressed the report which was leaked by activists in 2014.

In Odisha, India a nineteen-year struggle by indigenous communities, Dalits and farmers led to a historic victory in 2014 when Vedanta was stopped from mining the sacred Niyamgiri hills for bauxite. Vedanta’s attempt to secure the mountain through State Owned OMC was rejected by the Supreme Court again on May 6, 2016. Vedanta Aluminium Ltd had built the 1 mtpa Lanjigarh refinery at the base of the Niyamgiri hills in 2004, and even expanded it six-fold, despite having no permission to mine bauxite from the hills above. Vedanta’s launch on the London Stock Exchange in 2003 was based on the impression given to financiers that they had permission to mine Niyamgiri.

In Goa, India, Vedanta’s iron ore mining subsidiary Sesa Goa (now Vedanta Limited) was the largest company indicted by the Shah Commission in 2012 for illegal mining, including failure to obtain leases or environmental clearance, and exporting 150 million tonnes of iron ore from Goa in 2010/11 while only declaring 76 million, their agreed export allowance.

Not far from Jaipur itself Vedanta is accused by an employee’s union of casualising and de-unionising the labour force at Hindustan Zinc Ltd by reducing permanent workers to only 2,500 of 18,000 workers. The Maton Mines Mazdur Sangh (Maton Mines Workers Union) is also opposing Vedanta for poor working conditions and destruction of crops and houses around their phosphate mines. Meanwhile, on 11th May 2016 Anil Agarwal promoted Sterlite Technologies announced its successful bid to run a second ‘smart city’ project in Jaipur.

Vedanta has been attempting to create favourable public opinion by sponsoring International Film Festival of India (IFFI), the Our Girls Our Pride gender project and even the oxymoronic Mining Happiness campaign, using celebrities and media houses to hush up its liabilities. But each of these attempts has been exposed by grassroots groups and people’s movements pointing out Vedanta’s corporate crimes using social media and letter writing.

The Vedanta JLF at Southbank is yet again another cynical attempt to distract attention from Vedanta’s crimes at a time when it stands exposed across India and internationally. Vedanta’s interests are directly opposed to the Dalit, Adivasi, Bahujan Samaj and black communities it claims to be helping.

Literature doesn’t exist in a vacuum. As public figures, we believe that writers and artists also have responsibilities. It makes little sense to discuss books and ideas and the problems of the world in abstraction, while being funded by and publicising a company that has been and continues to be a gross violator of human rights across the world. We hope that you agree, and will withdraw from involvement in this discredited and damaging PR campaign, rather than lending your name to it.

[su_spoiler title=”Signatories” icon=”arrow”]Anu Ramdas, Editor, Round Table India
Naren Bedide (Kuffir), Editor, Round Table India
Courttia Newland, writer
Dr. Hansda Sowvendra
Shekhar Medical doctor and author, Jharkhand, India
Firoze Manji, former Editor, Pambazuka News
Gladson Dungdung, Activist, Author
Arao Ameny, Founder of Association of African Journalists & Writers
Neetisha Xalxo V.Divakar, Editor, The Baroda Pamphlet
Sruthi Herbert, Doctoral Candidate, SOAS
Ashley Tellis Akash Poyam, Founding Editor at adivasiresurgence.com
Surya Shankar, Filmmaker
Ashutosh Wasnik, senior human resources analyst at SaskPower, govt of Saskatchewan, Canada
Gaurav Somwanshi, Entrepreneur
Akshay Pathak, Writer
Cathal Healy-Singh, Environmental Engineer, Trinidad & Tobago
Atul Anand, Researcher & Documentary maker
Alex Lubin, Professor, University of New Mexico
Rafiq Kathwari, poet
Hemant Divate poet, editor, publisher and translator
Amrit Wilson
Kavita Bhanot, writer
Manju Rajak, Artist
Gouri Patwardhan, filmmaker Aflatoon, All India Organisational Secretary, Samajwadi Janaparishad
Vinay Shende, HR Professional
Nilesh Kumar, PhD Researcher, TISS
Dharma Teja, Dalit Camera
Amita Kanekar
Ananta Dash
Rollie Mukherjee, Artist & writer, Vadodara.
Tariq Mehmood, writer, Assistant Professor, American University,
Beirut Vinita Damodaran, Director, CWEH, University of Sussex
Saransh Gautam, IT Professional
Prameya M, Ph.D student
Vaibhav Wasnik, postdoctoral researcher, Saarland University, Department of Physics
Pinak Banik, Artist and Teacher
Stalin K., Director, Video Volunteers
Priyadarshini Ohol, Artist Abhiyan Humane, Artist and Teacher
Priyabrata Mahapatra, IT Professional
Subash Kulesika, Youth Leader, Niyamgiri Suraksha Samiti
Rebecca Oliner, Artist
Devangana Kalita, Foil Vedanta
Amarjit Chandran, poet
Taru Dalmia, the ska vengers
Samara Chopra, the ska vengers
Mohinder Singh, Assistant Professor, Political Science JNU
Samantha Asumadu, Media Diversified
Koonal Duggal, Researcher, Department of Cultural Studies, EFL University
Ganesh Digal, Odisha Research Scholars For Social Justice (ORSSJ)
James Nyasulu, community activist and pollution affected person, Chingola, Zambia.
William Chitundu, KCM former miners, Zambia.
Jonathan Mbewe, Residents of 1st Street against Pollution, Chingola, Zambia.
Miriam Rose, Foil Vedanta
Samarendra Das, Foil Vedanta [/su_spoiler]

Featured image for representation only. Source: Jaipur Literature Festival/Facebook

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