Breaking language barriers

Posted by Mahima Sinha
July 1, 2017

Self-Published

Living in  the year 2017, today in this ironic country of India, where our potential and intellect is still judged by the limitations of the languages we speak, it is saddening to state that we live amidst 1.3 billion people. Amidst diverse languages and dialects of which about 60% of the youth today with little or no exposure to the prime languages like that of English and Hindi which are given the utmost importance in all the working and employment sectors.

And while this search for such speaking people, many youths lay their talents and aspirations behind this great barrier of language.

Such is the story of Ramu, a young lad from the fresh state of Assam. A state known for its incredible tea leaves and young talented souls.

Ramu was in his early twenties when a letter deposited in his post box seemed to change his life. A letter stating his employment grant in a National Co-operative sector in Noida, Delhi and to the young and vivacious Ramu nothing seemed more endeavouring than that.

Hailing from a humble yet content family background along the Paddy fields of Silchar, nothing gave him more pleasure than reading books. Being a typical Bengali lad, Ramu enjoyed engrossing himself with books of Bengali literature and General knowledge. To him, languages like English and Hindi were absolutely alien but the potential in him was worth far more than knowing them.

Two months hence as he started off with his career, he was unable to communicate with his colleagues and seniors but things went worse when taunts started. And life suddenly turned out of favour to him.  He did think to opt for other languages but knew that would make his intense love for Bangla fade. And, eventually having faith and much great endeavours for his future, he finally resigned.

Language, as we all know is a tool for communication. Living in an independent secular nation where thousands of languages and dialects exist, every  citizen has the right to speak and preserve it’s very own wordings.

Yet living in the 21st century, we still feel that certain languages are superior to others. This is wrong. In order to make a society progressive, opportunities should be given to youth and the people who have the potential and rather than those with pretentious linguistic skills yet with poor wisdom.

Thousands of Ramus lay unemployed in our country today due to this language barriers. These barriers today should be demolished for the good tommorow as we all must know and admit that the universal language in the entire cosmos is love, adorning it’s uniform of virtuous intellect, and no other wordings are required if these both are true and pristine.

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