The Onus Of A ‘Harit And Swasth’ Diwali

Posted by Polley Bhunia in Environment, Society
October 14, 2017

 

With the festival of lights around the corner, the clamour against the use of firecrackers has also increased with the Supreme Court putting a ban to them in Delhi and NCR. Diwali embodies the triumph of good over evil. People who are colouring this pro-environment approach with a communal streak need to wake up and see the dangers of air pollution. We must understand that pollution is not bound by religion – it will affect everyone irrespective of caste, creed, religion, colour or status.

A 16-year-old in my locality is refusing to burst firecrackers this Diwali because he does not want to cause harm to the ozone layer. On the other hand, his neighbour, the lawyer dada (as he calls him) mocks the child’s attitude by saying, “You think you can save the ozone layer alone?”

What lawyer dada fails to realise is this attitude needs to change, and it is only an individual realisation that can bring about a positive change. If things don’t improve, India might beat China at air pollution levels.

Firecrackers don’t just affect the air quality, the noise they make affect animals too. Patients and elderly people also have to suffer the traumatic ear piercing noises. Nobody says that firecrackers are a symbolic part of Diwali.

We should aim for a noise free and pollution free Diwali and have a fun-filled environment-friendly celebration, instead.  So wake up and celebrate a Diwali without crackers. Only then will we truly understand the victory of good over evil.

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