‘The Target’ Book Review: An Insight into the life of Jignesh Shah

Posted by Arun Singh
October 26, 2017

Self-Published

Whenever we hear about inspirational stories about people who have made it big in their respective careers, we always hear of attempts where their naysayers tried to pull them down. Sometimes, they succeed and sometimes they don’t. In the case of Jignesh Shah however, his ‘competitors’ orchestrated the collapse of his entire empire but that only made him stronger, smarter and even more determined to change the face of the financial sector of India.

Jignesh Shah, FTIL, NSEL,The Target

‘The Target’ by Shantanu Guha Ray helps us to understand more about this charismatic entrepreneur with an extensively researched background for the book, numerous interviews, case studies while being very careful to avoid the monotony that is generally associated with these terms. Jignesh Shah’s rollercoaster ride is a compelling read in itself and the book itself can be compared to other investigative journalism books like celebrated author Truman Capote’s ‘In Cold Blood’.

Years of hard work that were put in by Jignesh Shah to craft an imposing empire will definitely get its fair share of conspiracies and overall jealousy. The book talks about the same and the ‘powerful unholy nexus of politicians, bureaucrats, crony capitalists who resented him for challenging their monopoly and democratizing the markets.’

Not only were the plots focused on Shah’s prestigious FTIL Group which would have been one of the most important financial boards in the coming future, but it also targeted Shah himself to complete eliminate him from the Exchange space, so that their rivals’ monopoly stops any kind of development or growth in that sector.

All of this is explained in the book with careful, meticulous investigation carried out by Ray, so that he could justify Jignesh Shah’s innocence in a world where his name has been desecrated time and again. Ray also talks about how Shah could have been the ‘Czar of Exchanges’ while being a forerunner and a facilitator for Prime Minister Narendra Modi’ ‘Make in India’ programme. His company may have been renamed from FTIL to 63 moons technologies but that does not change all those years where Shah developed innovation, pioneering creations and entrepreneurial spirit which is beautifully preserved, in the pages of Shantanu Guha Ray’s ‘The Target’.

Whenever we hear about inspirational stories about people who have made it big in their respective careers, we always hear of attempts where their naysayers tried to pull them down. Sometimes, they succeed and sometimes they don’t. In the case of Jignesh Shah however, his ‘competitors’ orchestrated the collapse of his entire empire but that only made him stronger, smarter and even more determined to change the face of the financial sector of India.

‘The Target’ by Shantanu Guha Ray helps us to understand more about this charismatic entrepreneur with an extensively researched background for the book, numerous interviews, case studies while being very careful to avoid the monotony that is generally associated with these terms. Jignesh Shah’s rollercoaster ride is a compelling read in itself and the book itself can be compared to other investigative journalism books like celebrated author Truman Capote’s ‘In Cold Blood’.

Years of hard work that were put in by Jignesh Shah to craft an imposing empire will definitely get its fair share of conspiracies and overall jealousy. The book talks about the same and the ‘powerful unholy nexus of politicians, bureaucrats, crony capitalists who resented him for challenging their monopoly and democratizing the markets.’

Not only were the plots focused on Shah’s prestigious FTIL Group which would have been one of the most important financial boards in the coming future, but it also targeted Shah himself to complete eliminate him from the Exchange space, so that their rivals’ monopoly stops any kind of development or growth in that sector.

All of this is explained in the book with careful, meticulous investigation carried out by Ray, so that he could justify Jignesh Shah’s innocence in a world where his name has been desecrated time and again. Ray also talks about how Shah could have been the ‘Czar of Exchanges’ while being a forerunner and a facilitator for Prime Minister Narendra Modi’ ‘Make in India’ programme. His company may have been renamed from FTIL to 63 moons technologies but that does not change all those years where Shah developed innovation, pioneering creations and entrepreneurial spirit which is beautifully preserved, in the pages of Shantanu Guha Ray’s ‘The Target’.

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