She is Alzheimer’s

Posted by Sneha Susan Jacob
November 7, 2017

Self-Published

She started by forgetting the little things in life, though she could recite what she learned several decades ago.

She went on to forgetting the routes to her favourite places, though she could clearly recollect the route from her house to her school.

We blamed it on old age cause we weren’t aware.

She greeted everyone with a broad smile and sometimes a grumpy face, when everything was normal with the world.

She was asked by everyone if she remembered them. She looked back blankly and said, of course quick-wittedly.

We blamed it on old age cause we weren’t aware.

She started forgetting how to go about her daily activities, never once giving up on her fight to live life.

She began asking our names several times every couple of minutes, just to engage in a healthy conversation.

We blamed it on old age cause we weren’t aware.

She tried her level best to stay active and engage in all the activities she could, even if it meant reading her Granddaughters comic books.

She could no longer speak as fluently and as fast as she could, but she held on to those dear lines lest she didn’t know what to say –

“See you soon.

God Bless you, my dear.

Cheers!”

We blamed it on old age cause we weren’t aware.

She could no longer recite all her favourite verses from the Bible, verses which she knew by heart and had taught two full generations the same.

She felt neglected and she was physically abused by the maid but she drowned in her confusion, not knowing if it had ever happened.

We didn’t blame it on old age anymore cause we were aware.

She is Alzheimer’s.

Behind the Scenes – As stated by the UN, The numbers of the oldest-old, those aged 80 years or over, are projected to increase from approximately 70 million in 2000 to 380 million in 2050.  Some of the major changes which take place during the natural process of ageing are unknown to many and awareness is key.

More about Lady A – As stated by the Alzheimer’s Association, Lady A is “a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behaviour. It is a general term for memory loss and other cognitive abilities serious enough to interfere with daily life. Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60 to 80 percent of dementia cases. Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease, where dementia symptoms gradually worsen over a number of years. In its early stages, memory loss is mild, but with late-stage Alzheimer’s, individuals lose the ability to carry on a conversation and respond to their environment. Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Although current Alzheimer’s treatments cannot stop Alzheimer’s from progressing, they can temporarily slow the worsening of dementia symptoms and improve quality of life for those with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers.”

Today, there is a worldwide effort under way to find better ways to treat the disease, delay its onset, and prevent it from developing. To the victims of Alzheimer’s, who are unable to speak up for themselves and the caregivers of these patients who are too worn out to advocate for change – Join the movement in continuing to celebrate age and help speak up for them.

40 million people worldwide and a cure still eludes researchers.

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