Why I Believe Our Adversities Only Make Us Stronger

I believe if you’re mentally unhealthy in the first place, it’ll affect your body. You need to accept it, and go through the difficult part thinking it’s an integral part of a much bigger scheme of things.

Confidence is often considered a precious quality. It is something only a few people are born with, while the rest of us are left wishing to acquire a taste of it. Confidence, in all fairness, is not a fixed attribute. It is a fickle companion. It depends significantly on the thoughts that fly through our mind and the decisions that are taken by us. It is an age-old fact that the beliefs we hold and nurture help us in directing our actions and shaping our mindset.

I still remember the day an interviewer asked a question that caught me off-guard. Well, he asked me when I feel the most confident. Now, this question might appear quite straightforward, but the answer is quite tricky. Confidence is viewed differently by different people.

A lot of people believe confidence is an external characteristic. They believe confidence is synonymous with appearance. However, if the entire concept of confidence is deconstructed, we’d realise that confidence can be summed up in three words; self-belief, security, and trust.

I must also discuss insecurities because all of us are surrounded by them all the time. Be it relationship or work; insecurities are bound to peep in from nowhere. 

Then, there are social interactions. Well, social interactions aren’t my cup of tea, I must confess. I feel like no one cares enough to be my friend and I believe that not even my family knows me because nobody is bothered to know me enough. But despite insecurities, I feel confident enough. And sometimes, it’s good to have insecurities about something as important as work, because those insecurities make us work harder.

I believe all of us have a unique story to tell even though the degree of hardship varies, there are struggles and challenges. I’m sure there are ups and downs as well. There are things we would have liked to have done differently, while there are things we’re proud of. All of that is a vital part of our story. Instead of getting bogged down by the struggles and hardships we are subjected to, we must learn to embrace them.

The game of cricket has taught me quite a bit about adaption. I’ve learned a lot of lessons through cricket. One such lesson is on adversity. In life, we aren’t given a lot of liberties or guarantees, our stories may be different, our hardships may also be different, but there’s one common link in all those stories. All of us, at some point, are bound to face some kind of adversity. All of us have gone through adversities, and the thing that inspires us to keep moving is the belief that we will succeed, eventually.

To keep on moving is as inspiring as it can get. It is a huge accomplishment because of all the adversities we face in our lives, we’re left with countless decisions to make; should I continue? would I lose belief in myself if I continue?

The biggest problem we face today is: we get things underway, but we find it hard to complete them; that holds true for almost all of us. Whatever we come across in life ends up shaping our mindset. Sometimes, situations and circumstances don’t really go the way we want them to, but that is exactly where we end up learning our lessons. We just need to make sure that we end up accomplishing the tasks that have already been started. Once we have finished something (despite limitations), we will be really proud of it when we look back at it.

Featured image for representative purpose only.
Featured image source: Jeswin Thomas/pexels.com.
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